Blog Archives

Words of Inspiration: Sylvia Earle’s Acceptance Speech at the Royal Geographic Society

Remarks for Royal Geographic Society, June 6, 2011Sylvia A. Earle I am deeply honored to be the recipient of the Royal Geographical Society’s 2011 Patrons Medal. It is humbling – and exhilarating — to join the company of some of my greatest heroes. Since my first breath of air under the sea in 1953, I have had the joy of spending thousands of hours diving, living under water, using submersibles, witnessing and sometimes participating in the greatest era of exploration in the history of humankind. As a research scientist and explorer, founder of three engineering companies, Chief Scientist of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and as a National Geographic Explorer in Residence, I have experienced the use of new technologies that for the first time have enabled humankind to connect the dots, see patterns, gain access to places, understand processes, and anticipate the future armed with unprecedented new insights.…
Posted in Award winner, Royal Geographic Society, sylvia earle |

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Journey OnEarth: An American Beauty

Referred to as part of America’s hardest working wetlands, Louisiana’s marshes are breathtaking, but it’s a natural treasure that’s disappearing at an alarming rate. In the second episode for Journey OnEarth, Sylvia Earle tells us why the once resilient marshes might be on the verge of extinction. To take a closer look at this unique ecosystem and examine what losing it means for us watch as Sylvia Earle and others share their knowledge about these precious resources in the short documentary below: Director: Roshini ThinakaranCamera/ Editor: Zakary WenningProducers: Roshini Thinakara, Zakary WenningWriter: Roshini Thinakaran Journey OnEarth follows correspondent Roshini Thinakaran, a National Geographic Emerging Explorer, as she reports about the people most impacted by pollution, oil spills, toxic chemicals, and communities coping with climate change across the country. …
Posted in Journey onEarth, marsh, National Geographic Emerging Explorer, Roshini Thinakaran, sylvia earle, wetlands |

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Sylvia Speaks at The Aspen Institute Environmental Forum

May 30 – June 2, 2011 By 2050, the world’s human population will probably have risen above nine billion, but it will also be on the verge of stabilizing after two centuries of explosive growth. Before us lies 40 years in the wilderness; beyond 2050 lies what we have to hope is a promised land. Getting there will take not just technical solutions that make life on earth sustainable; it will take a sustaining vision of our place on the planet. This year’s Aspen Environment Forum, in conjunction with National Geographic, explores the shifts in thinking and imagination that will be required to rise to the awesome challenge, from ways of reorganizing urban ecosystems, to preserving biodiversity and providing a stable climate, clean air, clean water and food for a growing global population.…
Posted in aspen institute, national geographic, sylvia earle |

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Ross Sea, Antarctic Hope Spot

Map of Antarctica Most people will probably never travel across the Southern Ocean either by ship or plane to the massive southern continent of Antarctica that anchors the South Pole. The Antarctica continent, drifted with tectonic plates into its current position between 30 to 60 million years ago (Ivany, et al., 2008). Once the continent was in place the cold Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) encircled it, and the land cooled and ice accumulated eventually covering most of the land to a depth of several thousand feet. As the continent cooled, so did the surrounding Southern Ocean, to a temperature several degrees colder than any other. The chill waters of the ACC separate the Southern Ocean from the slightly warmer waters to the north.…
Posted in Antarctica, ocean acidification, Richard Aronson, Ross Sea, Southern Ocean, sub-Antarctic king crab, sylvia earle, Sylvia Earle Alliance |

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The Ocean strikes gold in London

Michael Palin giving award to Dr. EarlePhoto by Lis Parham The rain cleared away, the skies brightened and nearly 300 guests arrived heralding a magical evening at the awards ceremony at the Royal Geographical Society in London. Sylvia, a long-time Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, was there to be honoured with the highest award that can be bestowed. It was back in April of this year that Sylvia was made aware that Her Majesty The Queen had approved the award to her of the Patron’s Medal of the Society for the encouragement, development and promotion of ocean science and exploration. Dr. Earle with Patron’s medalPhoto by Lis Parham This is one of the Society’s two Gold Medals which are the most prestigious medals awarded and one of the world’s highest accolades in geography.…
Posted in Award winner, Patron's medal, RGS, sylvia earle |

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Edward Harte’s Legacy Will Go On

By the time famed oceanographer Sylvia Earle met philanthropist Edward Harte in 2000, the two had accomplished more than most can dream. Harte, the former publisher of the Caller-Times and philanthropist, helped grow his family business into a $775 million empire while also becoming well known for his conservation efforts locally and abroad. Mr. Harte was an advocate of habitat protection and offshore drilling regulation for many years. William H. Dietel, chairman of the American Farmland Trust, said, “Ed has been a man of conservation for many years… Ed has the capacity to see critical need.” Harte died on Wednesday, May 18th. He was 88. It was not until Harte read one of Earle’s books, “Sea Change: A Message of the Oceans” that their lives crossed.…
Posted in Edward Harte, Harte Research Institute, sylvia earle |

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An interview with Sarah Frias-Torres at IMCC2

Dr. Sarah Frias-Torres sat down with Dr. Phil McGilliavry and Brendan Tougher to discuss her current research and passion for marine conservation, which focuses on marine megafauna and the need for collaborative research initiatives. She has a Schmidt Post Doctoral Fellowship with ORCA (Ocean Research and Conservation Association), in Fort Pierce, Florida and is a marine biologist, oceanographer and behavioral ecologist. Dr. Frias-Torres discussed the need for increased protection of the marine environment during her presentation at the IMCC2. To emphasize the fact that only 1.4% of the ocean is protected, she displayed a compelling image of the earth comparing the size of MPAs to the total size of the ocean (shown on the left). The tiny speck of yellow represents MPAs and the red circle represents the target of having at least 10% of the world’s ocean in protected areas by the year 2020 as agreed by the members of the Convention on Biological Diversity.…
Posted in IMCC2, MPA, Phil McGillivary, Sarah Frias-Torres, sylvia earle |

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Large MPAs for the Arctic? Challenges & Opportunities: A discussion with Dr. Dan Laffoley

Dr. Dan Loffoley Dr. Dan Laffoley is the Marine Vice Chair for the World Commission on Protected Areas of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN, http://www.iucn.org/). The focus of this Commission is a global partnership between park agencies and experts working together to protect the ocean. He is also the Senior Advisor for the Marine Science and Conservation Global Marine and Polar Programme at IUCN. Through his work, Dr. Laffoley has provided knowledge, innovation and leadership for new ways of conveying the importance of marine conservation to people throughout the world. To accomplish this mission, Dr. Laffoley advocates bringing science and policy initiatives together in order to communicate the threats of climate change to a broader audience. Dr.…
Posted in Dan Laffoley, IMCC2, MPA, Phil McGillivary, sylvia earle |

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A discussion about Multiple Use analysis and Marine Protected Areas with Jeff Ardron

Jeff Ardron (left) with Dr. Phil McGillivary (right) Jeff Ardron is the Director of High Seas Program (Washington DC) for the Marine Conservation Institute an NGO that advocates for marine conservation (http://www.mcbi.org/). He is co-principal investigator on the Surveillance and Enforcement of Remote Maritime Areas report (SERMA). At day two of the IMCC2 conference he talks about the relationships between fisheries and marine protected areas (MPAs) with Dr. Phil McGillivary. Dr. McGillivary: Where do you think issues between stakeholders and multi-use MPAs are going in the future? Jeff Ardron: Fisheries and conservationists are coming together. Conservation advocates are starting to realize that we need some of the flexible tools that fisheries are using, such as time-space closures to address issues of ecosystem variability.…
Posted in fisheries, IMCC2, Jeff Ardron, MPA, Phil McGillivary, sylvia earle |

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